The Duellists (1997)

The Duellists (1997)

An experimental animation made at uni in 1997. To animate, my portable 14″ TV was placed face up on the carpet while I positioned myself over the TV with pen and paper. An animator’s peg bar was cello taped to one side of the screen to ensure that the paper would always be placed in exactly the same position. I drew about 3 frames every second. As you can see, it’s VERY jerky! I can still vividly remember the laborious process of clicking the VHS frame counter every time I drew a frame. By the end of the week the VHS player was seriously damaged and the tape was just one big glitch. At the time, I never contemplated making the sequel for sanity reasons! All in all, it took around 700 drawings before being shot under an old EOS stop-frame camera. The sound score is mainly Morricone, though I used soundbites from other well-known films. Looking back at this animation 20 years on, the work employs the same principles as DIY punk ethics. Basically, a heap of shoddy charcoal drawings awkwardly mashed together. The result being a confusing manic montage. After editing the rotoscoped version, it was whittled down to 2:32 seconds in duration.

Jason murray

 

Heat, Light and Shadow (2014)

Heat, Light & Shadow (2014)

‘Sampled from Analogies: Study in the Movement of Time (1977) .
As the rhythm of the sample combined well with the visuals to augment the floating movements of the subject. The audio switches to a sample from the movie “Last House on Dead End Street” to emphasise the heat and intensity of the subject’s stare!’ 

Jonathan Chinchen (2014)

Don’t Have Nightmares 0.1: Psycho (2015)

Don't Have Nightmares 0.1 Psycho (2015)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stills

Psycho: Shower Head (frame 311)

Frame 311 (shower head)

 

 

 

 

 

Project References:

Don’t Have Nightmares 0.1: Psycho (sound Experiment 1)

Rotoshop experimenting begins (Steps 1 and 2)

Rotoshop experimenting: Step 3

Sparky Shower

Maquette No 1 (Part 1)

Maquette No 1 (Part 2)

Maquette No 1 (Part 3)

Maquette No 2: Materials (Part 1)

Maquette No 2: Construction (Part 2 )

Maquette No 2: Film (Part 3)

Contextual Research:

Photographic Pop Culture

Italian 1960s Lounge Music

 

 

Don’t Have Nightmares 0.2: Alienation & Conformity (2015)

Don't Have Nightmares 0.2 Alienation & Conformity (2015) MP4

 

Project References:

‘Cicadas, Crackling and Popping Wet Wood and Lost Laughter in the Breeze’

Alienation & Conformity Tests 1 & 2

The Tokyo Underground: Project Presentation

The Tokyo Underground: Emerging From The Underground Experiments

The Tokyo Undergound: The Moving (experiment 3)

The Tokyo Underground: The Commuter Rapid (experiment 2)

The Tokyo Underground: The Still & The Moving (experiment 1)

The Tokyo Gas Attack & Objects of Disobedience (for the wrong reasons)

The Tokyo Underground: Drawings, Notes & Nostalgia from the Underground

The Tokyo Underground: Preparatory Notes

Contextual Research:

The Art of Dinky: Shop Fronts Tokyo (Shinjuku & Koenji)

Fuchu no Mori Park-Tokyo

Workers

The Golden Gai-Shinjuku

Nobody Tokyo

Recruit Rhapsody (2012) – Maho Yoshida

Sink (1999) – Satoshi Tomioka

Untitled (2016)

Untitled (2016)

 

Project References

Public Information Film Project: Persuasive Narratives (part 2)

Public Information Film Project: Persuasive Narratives (part 1)

Portraiture

Rotoscoping: Linear Alterations, Before & After

Public Information Film Project: Colour Tests (sequences 1 & 10)

Contextual Research

Public Information Film Project: Contextual Research Notes

Evan Baden-Technically Intimate

Helping Johnny Remember

Sequences & Early Planning

Public Information Film Project: Sequence No 11

Public Information Film Project: Sequences Nos 9 & 10

Public Information Film Project: Sequence No 8

Public Information Film Project: Sequences Nos 6 & 7

Public Information Film Project: Sequences Nos 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5

The Drawing Process

Public Information Film Project: Storyboarding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disruptive Technologies (2017)

 

Disruptive Technologies (2017)

‘Based on 1970s British Public Information Films, the project explores the disruptive side of technology. The focus began analysing how devices interrupt our concentration when reading. However, through experiments and research, the project’s trajectory shifted to disruptions in urban environments. The city ambient sounds were recorded were while traveling from Tokyo to London. The soundscape depicts the daily bombardment of white noise city dwellers endure daily in the form of notifications, sirens, self-service machines and automated voices. Visceral voices that breathe invisibly within the city. The animated visual narrative follows a series of chaotic and fragmented forms. The following video documents the entire process from start to finish which began in 2015.

jpm17

Project References:

MA Fine Art Digital Summer Show 2017 Walk Through Discussion

The Making of Disruptive Technologies (2017)

Disruptive Technologies: Layering & Augmentation

Disruptive Technologies: Self-reflexivity & Black & White Aesthetics

Disruptive Technologies-Stand Clear of the Doors!

Sequence Five Motion Tween

Disruptive Technologies: SMS Alerts (test)/Soundscape Notes

Disruptive Technologies Montage

Disruptive Technologies: Testing, Sound & Visuals

Disruptive Technologies: Sequencing

Disruptive Sounds Experiments

Contextual Research:

Synthetic or human? The changing voices behind transport announcements

MA Fine Art Digital Summer Show 2017 Walk Through Discussion

The final post on the MAFAD course and post 198 just for the record. It’s a pity that work largely overshadowed the final month but that was expected. Nevertheless, I definitely feel I have achieved a lot on the course particularly in regards to personal development. See Unit 2 Critical Evaluation  for further comment. This month’s highlight was on the first day of the month. The Unit Two Symposium Talk  , seems a long time ago now. Looking back, why was the symposium condensed in one afternoon???? A six-hour marathon. I think I faded after four hours and that was about midnight for me. If I were to make any amendments to the course, I would definitely rejig that area right away.

And finally, two videos follow: The first by my daughter while attending the show and the second, a walk through discussion filmed by Jonathan and facilitated by former MAFAD students. The extract from the video focuses on my work with comments about my work which was very engaging and yet scary to watch. Jonathan also posted me encouraging comments (below) just before the work was being installed. Thank you for your support, Jonathan.

 

 

“It looks great and the overlay of sound from the 3 films work really well in the space. It gives constantly different visual and sound experiences due to the different lengths of the 3 films. The sound will also echo up the stairs drawing people down to the work”
Jonathan Kearney (2017)
 

 

The Making of Disruptive Technologies (2017)

Based on 1970s British Public Information Films, the project explores the disruptive side of technology. The focus began analysing how devices interrupt our concentration when reading. However, through experiments and research, the project’s trajectory shifted to disruptions in urban environments. The city ambient sounds were recorded were while traveling from Tokyo to London. The soundscape depicts the daily bombardment of white noise city dwellers endure daily in the form of white noise, notifications, sirens, self-service machines and automated voices. Visceral voices that breathe invisibly within the city. The animated visual narrative follows a series of chaotic and fragmented forms. The following video documents the entire process from start to finish which began in 2015.

Underdrawing

In this extract from The Secrets of Drawing: All in the Mind (episode 3)  Art critic, Andrew Graham-Dixon touches briefly on  underdrawing . Using drawing as my main tool and central in my process, I found this extract of the series particularly interesting and I’ve not read or found much on celebrated underdrawings. Here, Graham-Dixon informs us that during World War Two, an American fire bomb was dropped in Pizza, just missing the tower but landing on the nearby chapel. As a result, the lead roof melted, dripped down the walls damaging the 14th century frescos. But that wasn’t the end for the frescos as they now hang and are celebrated in a shoddy condition in the anti-chamber of the chapel. However, what became more astonishing and spectacular by pure fortuity, was that from the resulting blast, the frescos now reveal beautiful, detailed underdrawings made by Francesco De Triano. Probably one of the first instances where drawings reveal that order of raw consciousness, thinking and planning.  This made me consider what other hidden treasures could be found under great works of art? The extract concludes with a very engaging experiment conducted by John Tchalenko, Head of Drawing & Cognition at an educational institute I’ve become familiar with over the past three years, Camberwell University of Arts in London.

Extract times: 12:00-24:33 or a better idea would be to engage in the whole thing! It’s a cracking documentary.